Tag Archives: phrasal verbs

Phrasal verb: to bet on/to count on it

To bet on. This one is pretty easy. You can use this in the traditional sense of the word, such as to gamble. But if you are using it as a phrasal verb, it has a different meaning.

A similar phrasal verb is “to count on” but it does not have the same meaning as to gamble. I will explain to count on below.

Here are some examples.

  • Is Kevin coming to the party? Don’t bet on it/don’t count on it. (It means the probability is very low that Kevin will come)
  • Do you think Kaitlyn will pay me back (the money she owes me)? Don’t bet on it/don’t count on it. (It means the probability is very low that Kaitlyn will give you money)
  • Do you think Artie will call today? Don’t bet on it/don’t count on it. (It means the probability is very low that Artie will call)

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To count on:

You can count on a person. For example, if I need help with something I can call a friend to help me. I can count on him to help me.

  1. I can always count on my sister to help me.
  2. She can always count on her boyfriend to cheer her up after a hard day.
  3. Macey can count on her mom to help her when she is having a hard time.

 

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phrasal verb: to bend over backwards

To bend over backwards essentially means to go over the top in doing something for someone. “To go over the top” means to do everything you can possibly do to help someone and it’s not easy or fun for you to do.

Ex:

  1. I’ll help him with his report, but I’m not going to bend over backwards.
  2. She bent over backwards to help me. I really appreciated it.
  3. We bent over backwards to make him comfortable in our home.

 

 

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The verb “belong” as a phrasal verb

So, this one is an easy one! Seriously! This verb only has two uses as a phrasal verb, one is informal and one is more formal.

This is the most common use:

  1. This book belongs to me. (This is my book/This book is mine)
  2. This house belongs to me. (This is my house/This house is mine)
  3. That pen belongs to Kevin. (That is Kevin’s pen/That pen is Kevin’s)
  4. Those shoes belong to her. (Those are her shoes/Those shoes belong to her)
  5. That cat belongs to us. (That is our cat/That cat is ours)

 

This next use is pretty formal and is usually seen in writing.

  1. I belong to the ABC gym. (When speaking, we would say, I go to ABC gym)
  2. Kaitlyn belongs to the to soccer team. (When speaking, we would say, Kaitlyn is on the soccer team)
  3. Artie belongs to the Boy Scouts. (When speaking, we would say Artie is a Boy Scout)

 

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4 phrasal verbs with “back”

There are a few more phrasal verbs used with back but I’m just going to focus on the most common ones. Some phrasal verbs can be separated and some cannot depending on how you use them. In this list, you will see that sometimes you can separate them and sometimes you can’t.

  1. To back away-this means that you are stepping backwards to get away from a person or uncomfortable situation.
    1. Kylie told Macey that she was a terrible friend and that she didn’t want to talk to her ever again. Macey backed away in shock and turned and walked away.
  2. To back off-This is used when referring to a confrontation or an argument and one of the people stop arguing or stop yelling.
    1. Ashtyn and Gaby were yelling at each other because Gaby thought Ashtyn stole her favorite sweater. Ashtyn swore that she did not have it and asked Gaby to calm down and that she would help her look for it. Gaby backed off (stopped arguing/yelling) and started to calm down.
    2. Your boyfriend comes home and starts yelling at you to make dinner. You are watching tv and want to finish the episode you are watching. Your boyfriend continues yelling. You say, “back off! I will make dinner in a minute.” It means you want him to stop yelling at you, that you know hear him and will cook dinner in a few minutes.”
  3. To back out-You back out of an agreement.
    1. You and your brother both agree to pay $100 each to buy your mom a necklace that you both designed and had a jeweler make for you. Two days before you are supposed to pick up the necklace your brother says, he won’t pay. You say, Kevin! You can’t back out now! We have to pick it up in two days! (It means that he agreed to pay $100 and now is no longer going to do what he agreed to do previously.)
    2. To back out-This can also mean to back out of a parking spot, to back out of a garage. (It means to move a vehicle in reverse)
      1. Kaitlyn backed out of the driveway and hit the mailbox.
      2. Dominic back out of the garage and ran over Kevin’s bike.
  4. To back up-to support your claims or comments.
    1. The police suspect that you murdered someone. You claim that you were at the movies during the time the murder occurred. They ask you for your movie ticket to back up your claims. (this means to prove that you were at the movie theater.)
    2. To back up-To support someone or what someone says as being true.
      1. You are still at the police station and you say, let me call my friend Ashtyn, she can back me up, she was at the movies with me.
      2. You are at home with your brother watching a movie and your mom comes into the room says that her vase is broken. She wants to know who broke it. Neither of you broke it because you have been together watching the movie. You back each other up saying that you don’t know who broke it because you’ve been together for the last two hours. Right at that moment, your cat walks into the room and the right side of his body is wet. haha The cat broke the vase.

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5 phrasal verbs using the verb “to ask”.

There are a few more phrasal verbs that use the verb to ask but they aren’t used very often so I’d rather focus on the ones that will be more useful for you. You’ll see that this phrasal verb can be separated or kept together depending on how it is used.

Let’s start with ask for:

Ask for has a few different meanings.

  1. You can ask for something (money, a favor, a present, an object, something to eat/drink, etc)
    1. She asked her grandmother for $20.
    2. We asked for cokes before our meals.
    3. I asked for a telescope for my birthday.
    4. Kevin asked Kaitlyn to do a favor for him.
  2. You can ask for a person.
    1. Ashtyn called after you left for school and asked for you.
    2. Call the office and ask for mom, I need to talk to her.
  3. There’s an expression “asking for trouble” (**used in the gerund form)
    1. If you go out in that snowstorm, you are just asking for trouble. (It means that it is dangerous to go out because of the bad weather.)
    2. If you get back (together) with your ex boyfriend, you are asking for trouble. (Maybe the boyfriend was abusive and getting back together with him will be bad for you)
    3. If you eat that rotten apple, you are asking for trouble. (If you eat that rotten apple, you’re going to get sick)
    4. If you hire that guy, you are asking for trouble. (Maybe he is a known thief or is somehow known to be dishonest and if you hire him, he might steal from your company.)
  4. You can ask (someone) in. It means to invite someone into your home or another space.
    1. I went to Gaby’s office and she asked me in.
    2. Artie came over and I asked him in.
  5. You can ask someone out. If you ask someone out, it means you are asking them to go on a date with you because you are interested in them romantically.
    1. I really like Dominic, I think I will ask him out.
    2. You won’t believe what happened today! Jackson asked me out!

 

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Phrasal verbs with the verb “agree”, there are 3, do you know them??

There are 3 phrasal verbs that use the verb agree. They can be confusing because they are very similar.

  1. Agree on– That one or more people say yes or no to an idea.
    1. ex  1: We can’t agree on a place to eat. (One person wants chinese food, one wants pizza and one wants BBQ)
    2. ex 2: We can’t agree on a date for our wedding. (One person wants a spring wedding, one wants a winter wedding.)
    3. ex 3: Kevin and Kaitlyn couldn’t agree on which movie to watch. (Kevin wanted to see the one about ghosts and Kaitlyn wanted to watch the one about lions)
  2. Agree to– To accept something
    1. ex 1: The painters agreed to come on short notice to paint the dance hall.
    2. ex 2: My boyfriend agreed to fix the sink when he gets home.
    3. ex 3: The teacher agreed to allow the student more time to write the essay.
  3. Agree with-to share an opinion
    1. ex 1: I agree with you, Ashtyn, it’s too cold to take the children for a walk.
    2. ex 2: I think we need to talk to Kaleb. He hasn’t been behaving well at school. Do you agree with me?
    3. ex 3: She agreed with me and said, yes, but I think we should speak with the teacher first to see if he is having any problems at school.
  4. Agree with-if a situation suits you or you are comfortable with it.
    1. ex 1: Country life agrees with me. (It means, I am very comfortable living in the country)
    2. ex 2: Being a teacher agrees with me! (It means I love my job and it feels natural to be a teacher)

So, there you have it! 3 phrasal verbs with agree!

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Phrasal verbs with agree

 

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How well do you know your phrasal verbs with put?

There are many phrasal verbs with put. Today we will focus on 9.

Phrasal verb-meaning

Put out-to extinguish a cigarette or a fire

Put through-to do something that causes someone else emotional pain

Put on-to wear clothing, to change clothing, to wear jewelry or other accessories.

Put away-to put something where it belongs

Put up-To put something where it belongs -or-to put something on the wall, such as a poster or a picture frame.

Put down-you have something in your hands and you put it on the table or the floor -or- to say something mean to someone to make them feel badly about themselves.

Put off-to delay doing something, to procrastinate

Put across-convey information, to tell someone information

Put together-something is in pieces and you arrange the pieces to make it whole

Want to do some flashcards to review phrasal verbs with put? Click here to go to my quizlet page!

Then come back and take the quiz!

Phrasal verbs with put

Choose the correct preposition to go with the sentences with put that make the most sense.

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Phrasal verb: to catch up

There are many ways to use the phrasal verb to catch up.  Get ready! There’s a lot of information! Screen Shot 2017-10-02 at 11.51.58 AM.png

Catch up with

  • a person (updating each other about news in your life)
  • a person (if you are walking or running with someone and they are moving faster than you, you catch up with them. This means that you come from behind and are now even with them, walking or running at the same pace.)cat wearing glasses clip artYou can also say catch up to-they mean the same thing. (See below)
  • the class (if you have been absent, you have to catch up with the class. This means, you have to ask the teacher what the lessons were, maybe you ask your classmates for their notes so that you are “caught up” and know all of the information you missed while you were gone.

Catch up on

  • (home)work
    • I was absent last week so this weekend I have to catch up on my homework.
  • (house)work
    • I worked a lot last week, so this weekend I have to catch up on my housework.
  • work
    • I was on vacation last week, so this week I have to catch up on my work. (this is talking about any work, in general or work for your job.)
  • laundry/ironing/dishes
    • I worked a lot last week, so this weekend I have to catch up on laundry/ironing/dishes, etc.
  • sleep
    • I didn’t sleep well this week so this weekend I’m going to catch up on my sleep. (This means you plan to sleep longer than usual)

Catch up in

  • a class-I need to catch up in Spanish class. I’ve missed a lot of classes.
    • I need to catch up in Math class, I haven’t done my homework for a week and now I’m lost.****explain this idiom? Expression 

Catch up to

  • the class– maybe you have moved to a new school with a different curriculum and you are behind in the class. The teachers help you to catch up to the rest of the class by giving you extra help or extra homework. cat wearing glasses clip artAbove I said that you can catch up with the class. These both have a similar meaning except to catch up with has a more temporary meaning (like missing a few days of class) and to catch up to indicates a longer absence or a situation like moving to a new school where the curriculum is different. For example, some children have trouble reading at their grade level so a special teacher helps them. The goal is to catch up to their peers. Meaning, that they will be on the same reading level as their peers.
  • criminal behavior (if you are periodically stealing money from your boss, eventually it(it here, is the criminal behavior) will catch up to you.) **OR you can say, eventually he (your boss) will catch on to you. It means that he will start noticing that money is missing and he will start paying more attention to who has access to his money and he will eventually figure out who is stealing from him.
  • a person (if you are walking or running with someone and they are moving faster than you, you catch up to them. This means that you come from behind and are now even with them, walking or running at the same pace.)cat wearing glasses clip art

 

bonus icon .jpegTo get caught up in-so this is not necessarily the same as to catch up but it’s similar so I thought I’d add it to the list. cat wearing glasses clip artBecause we use “get” we have to change catch to caught. Caught is the past tense and participle of to catch.

To get caught up in (usually without being conscious/aware of it happening) means:

  • to get caught up in crime
    • this means that little by little you became a criminal. It started small and then before you knew it, you were robbing banks. For example, young children in the city sometimes start innocently (and sometimes not even knowing what they are delivering) delivering drugs for older teenagers because they think they are cool, then after a few years they start taking drugs, then they join a gang, then they start selling drugs. Ok, maybe it doesn’t happen so quickly but it happens!
  • to get caught up in traffic
    • this one is similar to being “held up” in traffic. It means, there’s a lot of traffic and you can’t move your car.
  • to get caught up in a movie/book
    • this one means that you are so engrossed in the movie that you lose awareness of your surroundings.
  • to get caught up in a relationship
    • we have all experienced this one! When you are first dating someone, it’s like the whole world disappears and it’s only you and your partner. You can’t talk to them enough. You want to be with them always. You get caught up in the relationship.

 

Screen Shot 2017-09-10 at 7.36.36 AMIf you feel like this, don’t worry! I do too! Screen Shot 2017-09-13 at 7.04.47 AM

I’ve created some flashcards if you’d like to review this phrasal verb! It’s free! Click here to do the flashcards!

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